Top Music Journalists to Cover Your Story – The 2020 List

Despite what some people may say, music labels and musicians need the help of industry journalists and reporters to reach a wider audience.

Good reviews or being talked about can help you carve a niche and convince people you’re worth their time. Plus, PR can also help win awards. Believe it or not, music that gets talked or written about is more likely to win accolades.

Yet, finding relevant reporters to build a music press list can be very time-consuming if you don’t have the right tools.

Prowly’s media database contains thousands of music journalists and outlets who can help you get media coverage. You can search the available contacts based on topic, outlet, location, or job position. With more than 1,000,000 media contacts in our database, you can be sure to find the right one for your story (oh, and it’s completely free for 7 days).

To help you build your media list, we used our database to show you some of the most respected journalists from the top music magazines and outlets.

The most influential music journalists

Greg Kot

Cohost, SoundOpinions
@gregkot

Kot, a former Chicago Tribune music critic, is one of the most powerful music journalists. He co-founded a podcast called Sound Opinion for people who love music.

He has more than 25,000 Twitter followers and thousands of loyal listeners who tune in to listen to his opinion on classics and the latest music.

Some very popular critics and journalists have graced his show. He’s known to promote new talent and working with him can be great for your business as he’s followed by other well-known critics.

Jim Fusilli

Music Critic, The Wall Street Journal
@wsjrock

Fusilli is more than just a music reporter. He’s also an author and an influencer. 

Don’t let the low number of Twitter followers fool you, Fusilli is quite popular and stays in touch with his followers through his site

A few years ago, while working with the WSJ, he started his own music website Renew Music. However, it doesn’t appear to be very active now.

Fusilli mainly concentrates on writing now and has published nine novels including some top sellers and award winning titles. However, he still occasionally covers music and has published several ‘best of series’.

The man also makes an appearance on different music-related YouTube channels and podcasts. He currently offers his services as a freelancer and can be great for your brand.

Jon Caramanica

Music Critic, The New York Times
@joncaramanica

Caramanica’s story is quite interesting. He graduated from Harvard and attempted to get a PhD but decided to be a music critic after failing to complete his doctorate.

He first wrote for Spin and Rolling Stone before turning to XXL. His career got a major boost when he became the music editor for Vibe, a well-known magazine. 

He kept the position for two years and eventually shifted to The New York Times in 2010 after working as a freelancer for the paper.

Today, he’s known as one of the most respected NYT music journalists and also runs his podcast titled Popcast.

Contact him if you’re looking to get published on the NYT. While he might not be the easiest to reach, NYT articles get thousands of hits and shares so it will be well worth the effort.

Jon Pareles

Music Critic, The New York Times
@JonPareles

Pareles is highly active and often publishes several times a week.

He started writing for The New York Times in 1988 and is now one of the paper’s most celebrated music journalists.

He’s one of the few critics who are loved by celebs and has interviewed the likes of Adele, Justin Bieber, and Pharrell. 

The man has contributed to several magazines and newspapers including Rolling Stone, the New York Daily News, Village Voice, Spin, Blender, and The Washington Post.

While he doesn’t seem to work with every artist or brand, it’s worth the effort due to his image and reach.

Nate Chinen

Music Critic, JazzTimes
@NateChinen

Chinen has over 20 years of experience. While he typically covers jazz, he has also reviewed other niches and is among the most respected music critics out there.

He built his career working for The New York Times but has also written for other publications including JazzTimes.

To know more about his work, have a look at his site.  

Chris Richards

Music Critic, The Washington Post
@chris__richards

If you wish to get published on The Washington Post, then get in touch with Richards. He has been working with the newspaper since 2009 and creates all kinds of content including reviews, opinion pieces, news pieces, and compilations.

Richards has contributed to several other platforms as well including Medium, Chicago Tribune, and The Denver Post. You might also find his work in a bunch of Aussie publications including Sydney Morning Herald and New Zealand Herald. 

Allan Kozinn

Music Critic, The Wall Street Journal
@kozinn

Kozinn is not just a music critic, he’s also a teacher and writer. He’s one of the few music journalists who have a degree in music and journalism. His work has appeared in popular newspapers and magazines including The New York Times, High Fidelity, Keynote, Pule, and Guitar Player.

Look at this man if you wish to reach a wide audience and get published on a number of platforms. He contributes to a variety of sites including The Wall Street Journal.

He has carved a niche in the world of music journalism and enjoys a decent fan following.

Hugh McIntyre

Music Critic, Forbes
@PopBangHugh

Looking for a young music journalist? Look at Hugh McIntyre, contributor at Forbes. Unlike other critics, McIntyre contributes to both big and small magazines including Huffington Post, Billboard, and Pop! Bang! Boom!. 

He has about 17,000 Twitter followers who he regularly engages with. You will see him make all kinds of posts including posts related to world events.

McIntyre seems to be followed by youngsters and can be great for brands that want to reach that demographic.

Find more music journalists

Interested in more names and details? Check our database to find both known and less popular names in the world of music journalism.

Sign up for a free 7-day trial and start building your music media list.

Photo by Mick Haupt on Unsplash